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Johnny Depp vs Amber Heard verdict free live stream Jury goes home for second day; Depp remains in U.K. for concerts

reached its end after closing statements that took place last Friday. Now, the world awaits the verdict of this $50 million defamation lawsuit, launched by Johnny Depp and against Amber Heard following her op-ed in the Washington Post in which she alluded to abuse committed by the Pirates of the Caribbean acto While pundits on the Law & Crime Trial Network mentioned that they expect the verdict to come within the next day or so, they also said that with a trial with this kind of media attention could take longer, up to a week, as the jurors review and weigh the mountain of information that was presented by both sides during the trial. Their predictions were based on the length of this trial, how long verdicts have taken from previous defamation trials in their experience and outside factors such as pressure on the jurors as a result of media scrutiny, etc.Throughout the last days of the extended proceedings, which were originally slated to finish two weeks ago, familiar faces including celebrities and friends of both Depp and Heard testified in court. Supermodel Kate Moss—Depp’s former girlfriend—debunked myths about Depp pushing her down a flight of stairs in Jamaica. His manager also testified on his behalf, as well as his former agent who testified in favor of Amber Heard. An orthopedic surgeon argued that Depp’s finger could not have been severed by Heard throwing a glass bottle at him, but Depp’s lawyer, Camille Vasquez, countered that claim in her cut-throat cross-examination. The much-awaited final verdict is expected to be released today or early within the next few days.

Amber Heard, Johnny Depp Verdict Could Bring Several Outcomes

with the in the v. Amber Heard defamation trial on Tuesday, supporters for both Depp and Heard are waiting to see which side will prevail in the high-profile trial and what monetary award, if any, the jury will decide on.Depp sued his ex-wife Heard for $50 million for defaming him in an op-ed she wrote in 2018 for The Washington Post, in which she alleged—without naming Depp—that she was a victim of domestic and sexual abuse. Heard countersued Depp for $100 million for nuisance, claims that are now being deliberated by the seven-person civil jury.During the six-week trial in Fairfax, Virginia, countless testimonies were heard from both Depp and Heard, as well as other witnesses, and experts, as well as abuse accusations from both parties. The court has heard audio recordings of the couple’s volatile arguments, graphic details ofamong other key moments.First, the jury could rule completely in Depp’s favor, meaning Depp would be awarded the entire $50 million he sought in his lawsuit. Or the jury could rule which could result in Depp having to pay $100 million in damages

This could be a possibility if the jury rules in favor of Depp and Heard is not able to pay the entire amount awarded to Depp. Several legal experts have already speculated that if that were to happen, the Aquaman actressLawyer Mark Breyer spoke on his TikTok account, saying, “So what’s going to happen is he [Depp] could go after all the money she had, she would probably file for bankruptcy, but certain things would be protected in bankruptcy. But the reality is that’s the problem with laws where people aren’t required to have insurance.

Some of Johnny Depp’s fans remain committed to staying at the Fairfax County Courthouse, even when the actor is across the globe.On Tuesday night, Depp played his U.K. concert with Jeff Beck, whom he started appearing with at shows over the weekend. Meanwhile, in his defamation trial against his ex-wife Amber Heard; though after about seven hours they went home and will resume their work Wednesday at 9 a.m.Even though Depp was nowhere in sight, some of his loyalists — who have been a fervent presence throughout the lengthy trial — showed up early in the morning to wait in line to get in the courtroom, knowing there was little chance they would see the actor in person.Johnny’s not here, so a lot of people are like, ‘meh,’” said Francesca Shanks of Luray, Va., who settled in with a book outside the courtroom. “I’m here to support him and hope he gets the verdict he deserve Listen4 minComment279Gift ArticleShareSome of Johnny Depp’s fans remain committed to staying at the Fairfax County Courthouse, even when the actor is across the globe.On Tuesday night, Depp played his U.K. concert with Jeff Beck, whom he started appearing with at shows over the weekend. Meanwhile, in his defamation trial against his ex-wife Amber Heard; though after about seven hours they went home and will resume their work Wednesday at 9 a.m.Even though Depp was nowhere in sight, some of his loyalists — who have been a fervent presence throughout the lengthy trial — showed up early in the morning to wait in line to get in the courtroom, knowing there was little chance they would see the actor in person.Johnny’s not here, so a lot of people are like, ‘meh,’” said Francesca Shanks of Luray, Va., who settled in with a book outside the courtroom. “I’m here to support him and hope he gets the verdict he deserves.”Unpacking the trauma in Amber Heard’s testimony5:10Default Mono Sans Mono Serif Sans Serif Comic Fancy Small CapsDefault X-Small Small Medium Large X-Large XX-LargeDefault Outline Dark Outline Light Outline Dark Bold Outline Light Bold Shadow Dark Shadow Light Shadow Dark Bold Shadow LightBoldDefault Black Silver Gray White Maroon Red Purple Fuchsia Green Lime Olive Yellow Navy Blue Teal Aqua OrangeDefault 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%Default Black Silver Gray White Maroon Red Purple Fuchsia Green Lime Olive Yellow Navy Blue Teal Aqua OrangeDefault 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%Jennifer Freyd, an expert in the psychology of sexual violence, discusses the impact of Amber Heard’s testimony in Johnny Depp’s defamation trial. (Video: Allie Caren/The Washington Post)Depp, 58, is suing Heard, 36, for $50 million for defamation after she wrote in The Washington Post that referred to herself as a public figure representing domestic abuse. Heard countersued Depp (who denied all allegations of abuse) for $100 million for defamation after his attorney called her claims a hoax.AdvertisementDepp’s daily appearance in the courthouse has led to a circus outside of it. While the scene quieted a significant amount on Tuesday, the frenzy didn’t disappear completely. A gigantic “Pirates of the Caribbean” pirate ship appeared on the street, and dozens of news cameras lined up outside. Court TV and Law & Crime started “verdict watch” on their respective streams. Someone set up a cluster of microphones in front of the courthouse in case the verdict is reached, and the attorneys want to have a news conference.A handful of fans and curious observers sat in the hallway outside courtroom 5J, where has been taking place, and compared notes on what they knew about Depp’s status. When Depp’s legal team walked by, one reporter asked whether the actor was still in the country, and attorney Camille Vasquez replied he was not.Another fan reported that Vasquez told them earlier that the actor “might” return Wednesday if deliberations continued.Depp’s representative did not return a request for comment on whether he will return for the verdict; Heard’s representative declined to comment on the record whether the actress will be in attendance Jhoane Garcia of Fairfax lives nearby, and has shown up frequently throughout the trial, and waved to Depp’s attorneys as they walked by. Lately, she said, she has found herself as drawn to the actor’s legal team as to Depp himself. “I’m going to stay here only because I wanted to say hello — they’re going to leave after the verdict,” she said. “And I just wanted to say goodbyenless you’re a troglodyte, you’ve been exposed to something about the Depp v. Heard trial in the past few weeks. Like many, I have averted my eyes—with guilty fascination—even as I’ve kept track of the defamation conflagration. As we all do nowadays, we watch or we read or we media-graze about these private turned public spectacles in bits and bytes, fearing that the sheer rancor and vulgarity might leave a kind of virtual stench—or, in my case, worrying that prolonged viewing might be triggering. (Don’t know what I’m talking about? Google: 1998.)Today, most of us are consuming gossip, news, and entertainment news totally differently than we did in the days of yore, from the first televised trial (of the Nazis’ final solution architect Adolf Eichmann, 1961) to the dawn of Court TV in the 1990s (Google: The People of the State of California v. Orenthal James Simpson). Instead, in lieu of watching coverage in real time (yes, John C. Depp, II v. Amber Laura Heard has been available on Court TV’s website and via livestream on YouTube), we have sampled mediated accounts of the trial on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook; through memes, video clips, and TikTok nuggets. Our consumption, therefore, has tended to be biased, curated, and cursory.What’s more, we have become so attuned to this narrow, cynical cycle of social media encounters that we consider the trial not tragic or pathetic, but as a pure car wreck: accessible, tawdry, and immediately gratifying. We dispense with critical thinking and substitute the cheap thrill. Such scattershot consumption hasn’t allowed for real comprehension. Instead, we experience only apprehension, knee-jerk outrage, and titillation. It’s like going to the opera and reading a couple of translated supertitles but not understanding Italian. And despite whatever else this is, it is a soap opera.In this perfunctory, voyeuristic way, I grazed through the testimonies, through cross-examination, through summation, observing not the trial but distorted shadows of the trial as reflected through the lenses of friends and pundits and weirdos. And the queasier I felt about this behavior—even if millions of others were doing the same—the more I came to realize that distortion, not objectivity, has evolved into an acceptable lingua franca.There is another complicating factor at play. Because the trial has also been available live on our screens, we think, subconsciously, that we have a right to look and watch. To judge. To comment. ​And we end up with this confusing cultural crossover of watching two people (whom we are used to seeing as actors acting on a screen) in a setting—a courtroom—where we would normally expect them to be assuming their characters’ roles.This blurring of public figures and private lives can do a number on us—as bystanders, as an audience. We end up being torn between our parasocial relationships with celebrities (we identify with them; we pretend that, gee, we actually know them) and our need to see public personalities taken down a notch or two—and taken down publicly—so as to make our wounded selves feel better in comparison. As Aldous Huxley put it in Brave New World, we are hooked on soma, a drug that we think is making us feel better but is actually numbing us. (Huxley, of course, wouldn’t blame us as we go about braving our new world of COVID variants, monkeypox, Ukraine, politics, and mass murders.

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